.NET

New killer features planned for .NET Core, ASP.NET Core and Entity Framework Core 2.1

Microsoft announced roadmap for upcoming release of .NET Core family versioned as .NET Core 2.1. While there are some new features and many improvements coming I compiled a list of my favorites that I see as most imortant to all developers building solutions on .NET Core, ASP.NET Core and Entity Framework Core.

Entity Framework Core with .NET Core console application

ASP.NET Core makes it very easy to configure and use Entity Framework Core in web applications. For .NET Core console applications there is no such machinery available but we can still use Entity Framework Core in console applications. This post shows how to wrap database context initialization to separate class and use Entity Framework Core synchronous and asynchronous calls in .NET Core console application.

Switching C# version in Visual Studio

Want to try out features of newest of some specific version of C# but Visual Studio 2017 can’t compile it? Well, by default major versions of C# are supported and if some other version is needed it must be turned on from project settings. This blog post shows how to switch between C# versions in Visual Studio 2017.

Ref returns and ref locals in C# 7.0

C# 7.0 introduces ref returns and ref locals. Main goal of these new features is to make it easier for developers to pass around references to value types instead of copies of their values. This is important when working with large data structures that are implemented as value types. This blog post shows how to use ref returns and ref locals in Ć#.

New expression bodied members in C# 7.0

Although expression bodied members have been supported in C# few years there were still room for some new ones. C# 7.0 introduces expression bodied constructors, destructors, getters and setters. This blog bpost goes through all these new expression bodied members and shows how to use them. Also a little peek behind the compilator curtains is made.

Internals of tuple literals

My last post about tuple literals gave brief intorduction to these. This post goes to internals of tuple literals, peeks behind the compiler and shows what happens with tuple literals internally. This post is for developers who are new to tuple literals and want to gain more deep understanding of these.

Performance of compiled queries in Entity Framework Core 2.0

Before applying any optimizations to our code we have to ask one question: what is the cost of improvement and is it really improvement? Compiled queries in Entity Framework 2.0 are categorized as high-availability feature but before making any decisions we need to know what is the actual win. This blog post introduces the measurements I made with simple database context to compare compiled and uncompiled queries in Entity Framework Core 2.0.

Writing IL code on Visual Studio

Microsoft Intermedia Language (MSIL) is .NET assembly language that is standardized under name Common Intermediate Language (CIL). All .NET compilers turn source code to this language. Although we hardly have a situation where we have to write intermedia language (IL) code directly it is still good to know how it works and how it is supported on Visual Studio. This blog post fills the gap and shows how to write IL code on Visual Studio.

How to avoid overlapping timer calls?

Timers are useful .NET feature. With timers we can execute code with specified interval. With real scenarios we can easily face situations where timer calls its callback again but previous call is not finished yet. It may end up with loading some external system too much. It may also end up by making unexpected parallel data processing that distorts the results. This post introduces some options to avoid overlapping timer calls.

Are lock and Monitor the same in C#?

Working on some threading stuff I stumbled upon some discussions about lock and Monitor. Some say they are different and some say they are the same. I took few minutes of time to make some simple experiments with both of these. This blog post shows what C# compiler does with lock statement. As I had to use also Monitor class I added one example here how to use it instead of lock.

Deep dive to async Main

C# 7.1 introduces asynchronous Main method for console applications. It helps us to get rid of some ugly code to await for asynchronous methods. If Main method of console applications is application flow controller that makes multiple calls to asynchronous methods then async Main leads us to much cleaner code. This blog post is my deep dive to async Main.

NotSupportedException: No data is available for encoding 1252

Another day, another surprise on .NET Core. Tried to load a file with Windows-1252 encoding and got the following exception: NotSupportedException: No data is available for encoding 1252. For information on defining a custom encoding, see the documentation for the Encoding.RegisterProvider method. Here’s how to solve the problem.

Unit testing multi-tenant database provider

My saga on supporting multiple tenants in ASP.NET Core web applications has come to point where tenants can use separate databases. It’s time now to write some tests for data context to make sure it behaves correct in unexpected situations. This post covers unit tests for data context and multi-tenancy.

Global query filters in Entity Framework Core 2.0

Entity Framework Core 2.0 introduces global query filters that can be applied to entities when model is created. It makes it easier to build multi-tenant applications and support soft deleting of entities. This blog post gives deeper overview about how to use global query filters in real-life applications and how to apply global query filters […]

.NET Core, ASP.NET Core, EF Core and .NET Standard 2.0 announced

Today Microsoft announced versions 2.0 of .NET Standard, .NET Core, ASP.NET Core and Entity Framework Core. Also new updated to Visual Studio 2017 are available (both stable and preview version). This blog post is summary of most important features announced today.

Running PHP applications on .NET Core

Ever wondered about mixing up simplicity and flexibility of PHP with power and performance of .NET Core? The solution is coming and it is called Peachpie, the successor of Phalanger. This blog posts introduces Peachpie – the tool to compile PHP code to .NET Core – and helps to get started with it.

Local functions in C# 7.0

One of new features of C# 7.0 is support for local functions. Local functions are methods that are defined inside other methods to simplify more complex code and by example to support local recursion. This blog post shows how to use local functions in C# 7.0 and gives some advice in context of technical design of code.

Simple .NET Core application using VB.NET

.NET Core 2 Preview 1 bits bring us support for VB.NET on .NET Core. Although tooling for web applications is not ready yet we can start with console applications and also some web applications like I will show in some of my later posts. Visual Studio 2017 Preview 2 is needed to try VB.NET out on .NET Core. This blog post is short demo about how to build simple utility application on .NET Core 2 Preview 1 using VB.NET.

Throw expressions in C# 7.0

C# 7.0 introduces throw expressions. We can add exception throwing to expression-bodied members, null-coalescing expressions and conditional expressions. This blog post introduces throw expressions, demonstrates how to use them and also provides a peek behind a compiled throw expressions.

Tuple literals in C# 7.0

C# 7.0 brings some new features to tuples and with code editors that support these new features we can use tuples with named members instead of names like Item1…ItemN. This blog post goes through practical example that demonstrates how to move on classic method that returns multiple values to new tuples.

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