Controlling randomizer using code contracts

One cool addition to Visual Studio 2010 is support for code contracts. Code contracts make sure that all conditions under what method is supposed to run correctly are met. Those who are familiar with unit tests will find code contracts easy to use. In this posting I will show you simple example about static contract checking (example solution is included).

Using runtime checking of code contracts in Visual Studio 2010

In my last posting about code contracts I introduced how to check input parameters of randomizer using static contracts checking. But you can also compile code contracts to your assemblies and use them also in runtime. In this posting I will show you simple example about runtime checking of code contracts.

Code Contracts: Hiding ContractException

It’s time to move on and improve my randomizer I wrote for an example of static checking of code contracts. In this posting I will modify contracts and give some explanations about pre-conditions and post-conditions. Also I will show you how to avoid ContractExceptions and how to replace them with your own exceptions.

Code Contracts: Unit testing contracted code

Code contracts and unit tests are not replacements for each other. They both have different purpose and different nature. It does not matter if you are using code contracts or not – you still have to write tests for your code. In this posting I will show you how to unit test code with contracts.

Forcing code contracts through interface contracts

Sometimes we need a way to make different implementations of same interface follow same rules. One option is to duplicate contracts to all implementation but this is not good option because we have duplicated code then. The other option is to force contracts to all implementations at interface level. In this posting I will show you how to do it using interface contracts and contracts class.

Invariant code contracts – using class-wide contracts

It is possible to define invariant code contracts for classes. Invariant contracts should always hold true whatever member of class is called. In this posting I will show you how to use invariant code contracts so you understand how they work and how they should be tested.

Code contracts and inheritance

In my last posting about code contracts I introduced you how to force code contracts to classes through interfaces. In this posting I will go step further and I will show you how code contracts work in the case of inherited classes.

Enabling XML-documentation for code contracts

One nice feature that code contracts offer is updating of code documentation. If you are using source code documenting features of Visual Studio then code contracts may automate some tasks you otherwise have to implement manually. In this posting I will show you some XML documentation files with documented contracts. I will also explain how this feature works.

Using Sandcastle to build code contracts documentation

In my last posting about code contracts I showed how code contracts are documented in XML-documents. In this posting I will show you how to get code contracts documented with Sandcastle and Sandcastle Help File Builder.

Code Contracts: How they look after compiling?

When you are using new tools that make also something at code level then it is good idea to check out what additions are made to code during compilation. Code contracts have simple syntax when we are writing code at Visual Studio but what happens after compilation? Are our methods same as they look in code or are they different after compilation? In this posting I will show you how code contracts look after compiling.

Code Contracts: validating arrays and collections

Validating collections before using them is very common task when we use built-in generic types for our collections. In this posting I will show you how to validate collections using code contracts. It is cool how much awful looking code you can avoid using code contracts.