Books

Microsoft .NET: Architecting Applications for the Enterprise

Enterprise applications need good architecture to survive ever-changing demands of customers. At same time these systems must be stable, convenient and easy to use which leads us to need of good architecting skills. Some customers need desktop applications while others need web-based and mobile applications. Making good architectural decisions is not easy and this is […]

Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software

Design Patterns is golden classics of software design books written by Erich Gamma, Richard Helm, Ralph Johnson and John Vlissides (aka Gang of Four – GoF). When this book was published first it was revolutionary because it contained still undocumented knowledge from software development field that needed some systematic work and organization on it. Today we see these patterns in many programs and developers on different platforms are more and more aware of these first defined design patterns. If you are software developer then this is must-have book for you.

Programming Windows Identity Foundation

Programming Windows Identity Foundation by Vittorio Bertocci is right now the only serious book about Windows Identity Foundation available. I started using Windows Identity Foundation when I made my first experiments on Windows Azure AppFabric Access Control Service. I wanted to generalize the way how people authenticate theirselves to my systems and AppFabric ACS seemed to me like good point where to start. My first steps trying to get things work opened the door to whole new authentication world for me.

Peopleware: Productive Projects and Teams

Peopleware by Tom DeMarco and Timothy Lister is golden classic book that can be considered as mandatory reading for software project managers, team leads, higher level management and board members of software companies. If you make decisions about people then you cannot miss this book. If you are already good on managing developers then this […]

Free e-book: Moving to Visual Studio 2010

Those who are still using older versions of Visual Studio may find the free e-book “Moving to Microsoft Visual Studio 2010” useful when deciding if it is time to move to Visual Studio 2010 or not. The book is written by Ken Haines, Pascal Paré and Patrice Pelland who all work in Microsoft Consumer and Online Division.

Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture

Lately I finished reading the famous patterns book by Martin Fowler – Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture. This book introduces and describes design patterns you will usually see when building enterprise applications. There are also examples for patterns and although they are simple and primitive they give you the idea how to implement or use specific patterns. If you are working on enterprise applications every day you will find this book very useful and I’m sure you will use it as manual.

Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship

Writing code that is easy read and test is not something that is easy to achieve. Unfortunately there are still way too much programming students who write awful spaghetti after graduating. But there is one really good book that helps you raise your code to new level – your code will be also communication tool for you and your fellow programmers.

Why Software Sucks…and What You Can Do About It

How do our users see the products we are writing for them and how happy they are with our work? Are they able to get their work done without fighting with cool features and crashes or are they just switching off resistance part of their brain to survive our software? Yeah, the overall picture of software usability landscape is not very nice. Okay, it is not even nice. But, fortunately, Why Software Sucks…and What You Can Do About It by David S. Platt explains everything.

The Mythical Man-Month

Yesterday I finished reading the classic project management book The Mythical Man-Month: Essays on Software Engineering by Frederick P. Brooks. Well… this book made me think a lot about nature of software projects, how primitive is our understanding about them and why managing such projects is usually hard fighting with a lot of different issues. The book has also interesting content from the past that is really interesting reading. To understand where you are you should know where you come from.

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